Resources

Showing 65–80 of 145 results

  • Maths vocabulary sort

    $0.00

    This sorting activity is designed for students in grades 3-6. It reinforces mathematical vocabulary for addition, subtraction and fractions.

  • This is not my hat

    $0.00

    These book notes provide a teaching sequence for English lessons using the book, This is not my hat.  The lessons have been written with students in years one and two in mind and examine the big idea that the author’s message can be conveyed through words and images.

  • Cocoon

    $0.00

    These book notes for the book, Cocoon by Aura Parker unpack teaching ideas for reading and responding to the text as well as composing. They have been designed for students in years 1 and 2. They address the big idea of patience, perseverance and friendship.

     

  • Elkonin boxes

    $0.00

    The pages in this resource can be used to establish this practice of segmenting words into sounds. Many teachers will be familiar with Elkonin boxes. These cards are used to establish the practice and then students can use this principle in their writing with boxes or even lines for each sound.

  • Effective questions

    $0.00

    Asking questions that lead students to further learning requires thought by teachers. Here is a chart to raise awareness about what makes a effective question.

  • Setting up your room for success

    $0.00

    Do you want a calm, collaborative and consistent classroom in 2020? Use this checklist to think about how you plan and organise your room.

  • Multiplication Bingo

    $0.00

    A multiplication game with a baseboard and instruction on how to play.

  • Beginning, middle and end

    $0.00

    This template, for drawing and writing about the beginning, middle and end of a story that students have read or are planning to write, needs no instructions. A useful tool for all grades.

  • Idioms

    $0.00

    An idiom is an expression peculiar to a language that cannot be taken literally, for example, ’I’ve got a frog in my throat.’ Reference: glossary NSW English Syllabus, page 137. Teaching idioms is a stage 2 and 3 outcome.

  • Character

    $0.00

    This template may help students in reflecting on characters read about and in creating characters to write about.

  • Girl on wire

    $0.00

    These book notes for the book, Girl on wire, by Lucy Estella and Elise Hurst unpack teaching ideas for reading and responding to the text as well as composing. They have been designed for students in years 3 and 4.

  • Millie loves ants

    $0.00

    Millie loves ants, has a simple storyline and clear illustrations that tell the story of Millie, an echidna, out searching for ants. Jackie French uses rhyming words, repetition, beautiful descriptive language and an interesting font to tell this story.This Book Note has been written for Kindergarten and explores early reading and writing behaviours. The text is read on You Tube so these lessons could be taught using the You Tube reading of the book.

  • Australian painter: Arthur Streeton

    $0.00

    In this lesson the work of Arthur Streeton is viewed and discussed. Students then create a frame and use this frame to create a drawing.

  • Ten steps to effective composing

    $0.00

    Posters provide colourful easy reminders for teachers and students.

  • I’m just no good at rhyming…St 2

    $0.00

    Two poems from the book, I’m just no good at rhyming and other nonsense  by Chris Harris have been selected for this Poetry Picks which provides teaching ideas for the poems: ‘The one-eyed Orr’, a fun play on words and ‘My dessert tummy.’ The lessons have been designed for students in years 3 and 4.

  • I’m just no good at rhyming… St 3

    $0.00

    Two poems from the book, I’m just no good at rhyming and other nonsense  by Chris Harris, have been selected for this Poetry Picks which provides teaching ideas around the idea of appropriation. The lessons have been designed for students in years 5 and 6. The poems selected are: Two Roads: which is  compared with The road less travelled by Robert Frost and Jack Sprat (Updated): which is compared  with the nursery rhyme Jack Sprat.